Tag Archives: bottle

Rethinking the headache of reassessments with Python

One of the challenges I've faced in doing reassessments since starting Standards Based Grading (SBG) is dealing with the mechanics of delivering those reassessments. Though others have come up with brilliant ways of making these happen, the design problem I see is this:

  • The printer is a walk down the hall from my classroom, requires an ID swipe, and possibly the use of a paper cutter (in the case of multiple students being assessed).
  • We are a 1:1 laptop school. Students also tend to have mobile devices on them most of the time.
  • I want to deliver reassessments quickly so I can grade them and get them back to students immediately. Minutes later is good, same day is not great, and next day is pointless.
  • The time required to generate a reassessment is non-zero, so there needs to be a way to scale for times when many students want to reassess at the same time. The end of the semester is quickly approaching, and I want things to run much more smoothly this semester in comparison to last.

I experimented last fall with having students run problem generators on their computers for this purpose, but there was still too much friction in the system. Students forgot how to run a Python script, got errors when they entered their answers incorrectly, and had scripts with varying levels of errors in them (and their problems) depending on when they downloaded their file. I've moved to a web form (thanks Kelly!) for requesting reassessments the day before, which helps me plan ahead a bit, but I still find it takes more time than I think it should to put these together.

With my recent foray into web applications through the Bottle Python framework, I've finally been able to piece together a way to make this happen. Here's the basic outline for how I think I see this coming together - I'm putting it in writing to help make it happen.

  • Phase 1 - Looking Good: Generate cleanly formatted web pages using a single page template for each quiz. Each page should be printable (if needed) and should allow for questions that either have images or are pure text. A function should connect a list of questions, standards, and answers to a dynamic URL. To ease grading, there should be a teacher mode that prints the answers on the page.
  • Phase 2 - Database-Mania: Creation of multiple databases for both users and questions. This will enable each course to have its own database of questions to be used, sorted by standard or tag. A user can log in and the quiz page for a particular day will automatically appear - no emailing links or PDFs, or picking up prints from the copier will be necessary. Instead of connecting to a list of questions (as in phase 1) the program will instead request that list of question numbers from a database, and then generate the pages for students to use.
  • Phase 3 - Randomization: This is the piece I figured out last fall, and it has a couple components. The first is my desire to want to pick the standard a student will be quizzed on, and then have the program choose a question (or questions) from a pool related to that particular standard. This makes reassessments all look different for different students. On top of this, I want some questions themselves to have randomized values so students can't say 'Oh, I know this one - the answer's 3/5'. They won't all be this way, and my experience doing this last fall helped me figure out which problems work best for this. With this, I would also have instant access to the answers with my special teacher mode.
  • Phase 4 - Sharing: Not sure when/if this will happen, but I want a student to be able to take a screenshot of their work for a particular problem, upload it, and start a conversation about it with me or other students through a URL. This will also require a new database that links users, questions, and their work to each other. Capturing the conversation around the content is the key here - not a computerized checker that assigns a numerical score to the student by measuring % wrong, numbers of standards completed, etc.

The bottom line is that I want to get to the conversation part of reassessment more quickly. I preach to my students time and time again that making mistakes and getting effective feedback is how you learn almost anything most efficiently. I can have a computer grade student work, but as others have repeatedly pointed out, work that can be graded by a computer is at the lower level of the continuum of understanding. I want to get past the right/wrong response (which is often all students care about) and get to the conversation that can happen along the way toward learning something new.

Today I tried my prototype of Phase 1 with students in my Geometry class. The pages all looked like this:

Image

I had a number of students out for the AP Mandarin exam, so I had plenty of time to have conversations around the students that were there about their answers. It wasn't the standard process of taking quiz papers from students, grading them on the spot, and then scrambling to get around to have conversations over the paper they had just written on. Instead I sat with each student and I had them show me what they did to get their answers. If they were correct, I sometimes chose to talk to them about it anyway, because I wanted to see how they did it. If they had a question wrong, it was easy to immediately talk to them about what they didn't understand.

Though this wasn't my goal at the beginning of the year, I've found that my technological and programming obsessions this year have focused on minimizing the paperwork side of this job and maximizing opportunities for students to get feedback on their work. I used to have students go up to the board and write out their work. Now I snap pictures on my phone and beam them to the projector through an Apple TV. I used to ask questions of the entire class on paper as an exit ticker, collect them, grade them, and give them back the next class. I'm now finding ways to do this all electronically, almost instantly, and without requiring students to log in to a third party website or use an arbitrary piece of hardware.

The central philosophy of computational thinking is the effort to utilize the strengths of  computers to organize, iterate, and use patterns to solve problems.  The more I push myself to identify my own weaknesses and inefficiencies, the more I am seeing how technology can make up for those negatives and help me focus on what I do best.

Coding IS a super(edu)power

I've been really impressed by the Dan Meyer/Dave Major collaboration. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you need to click on that link immediately. Seeing both Dan and Dave post on their respective blogs about the thought and rationale that goes into these activities is like a masters class in pedagogy, digital media, and user design.

The common thread that I really like about these tools is the clean and minimalist way they pose an idea, encourage a bit of play and intuition, and then get out of the way. Dan has talked about these ideas philosophically for a while, and seeing Dave make these happen is really exciting. They talk about this being the future of textbooks, but I am willing to wager that textbooks will get fidgety at displaying a task to a user atop a blank white screen. The trend has been so far in the other direction that I am skeptical, but I am hopeful that they will start to listen. These exercises are like a visit to the Museum of Modern Art. Textbooks and online learning otherwise tends to look either like a visit to Chuck-E-Cheese or the town library, over-thinking or under-thinking the power of aesthetics to creating a learning environment that is stimulating enough, but not distracting.

Being a committed Twitter follower, I of course interrupted their workflow with suggestions. I was looking for an easy way to collect student responses to a question along the lines of Activeprompt, but for tasks that are not about finding a location. I had posed a question to my Geometry class and was really excited about greasing the rails for gathering student responses and putting them in one place. This is the same idea as what Dan/Dave had done, but with a bit less of a framework pushing it in a direction.

Dave's suggestion was, well, intimidating:

Screen Shot 2013-03-21 at 4.48.19 PM

I had been playing around with web2py, Django, Laravel, and other template frameworks that said they would make things easy for me, but it just didn't click how they would do this. I have done lots of small Python projects, but the prospect of making a website seemed downright unlikely. I spent three hours putting together this gem using the CSS I had learned from CodeAcademy:
Screen Shot 2013-03-21 at 4.56.54 PM

I was not proud of this, but it was the best I thought I could do.

Through the power of Twitter, I was able to actually have a conversation with Dave and learn how he put his own work together. He uses frameworks such as Raphael.js and Sinatra in a way that does just enough to achieve the design goal. I learned that he wasn't doing everything from scratch. He took what he needed from what he knew about these different tools and constructing precisely what he envisioned for his application. I prefer Python to Ruby because, well, I don't know Ruby. I found Bottle which works beautifully as a small and simple set of tools for building a web application in Python, just as Dave had done with his tools.

Using Bottle and continuing to learn how it works, I made this yesterday.
BFwz3k5CQAEE2ts.png-large

I shared it with Dave, and he revealed another of his design secrets: Bootstrap. Again, dumbstruck by the fact this sort of tool exists, but also that I hadn't considered that it might. This led me to clean up my previous submission and reconsider what might be possible. With a bit more tinkering, I turned this into what I had envisioned: a flexible tool for collecting and sharing student responses to a question
Screen Shot 2013-03-21 at 5.12.14 PM

I was just tickled pink. Dave had shown me his prototype for what he made in response to my prompt - I was blown away by it, as with the rest of his work. Today, however, I proudly used my web app with two of my classes and was happy to see that it worked as designed.

The point behind writing about this is not to brag about my abilities - I don't believe there is anything to brag about here. Learning to code has gotten a good mix of press lately on both the positive and negative side. It is not necessarily something to be learned on its own, for its own sake.

I do want to emphasize the following:

  • My comfort with coding is developed enough at this point that I could take my idea for how to do something in the classroom using programming and piece it together so that it could work. I got to this point by messing around and leaving failed projects and broken code behind. This is how I learn, and it has not been a straight line journey.
  • If I was not in the classroom on a regular basis, I doubt I would have these ideas for what I could do with coding if I had the time to focus on it completely. In other words, if I ditched the classroom to code full time (which I am not planning to do) I would run out of things to code.
  • Twitter and the internet have been essential to my figuring out how to do this. Chatting virtually with Dave, as an example, was how I learned there was a better way than the approach I was taking. There are no other people in my real world circles who would have introduced me to the tools that I've learned about from Dave and other people in the twitterverse. Face to face contact is important, but it's even better getting virtual face time with people that have the expertise and experience to do the things I want to learn to do.
  • I have been writing code and learning to code from the perspective of trying to do a specific and well defined task. This is probably the most effective and authentic learning situation around. We should be looking for ways to get students to experience this same process, but not by pushing coding for its own sake. As with any technology, the use needs to be defined and demanded by the task.
  • The really big innovations in ed-tech will come from within because that's where the problems are experienced by real people every day. Outsiders might visit and see a way to help based on a quick scan of what they perceive as a need. I'm not saying outsiders won't or can't generate good ideas or resources. I just think that tools need to be designed with the users in mind. The best way to do this is to give teachers the time, resources, and the support to build those tools themselves if they want to learn how.

You can check out my code at Github here. Let me know if you want to give it a shot or if you have suggestions. This experiment is far from over.