Monthly Archives: November 2014

Direct Instruction Videos - What's your Workflow?

I've written before about my experience recording my direct instruction into short, Udacity style videos and having students watch them during class. This enables me to circulate and have a lot more conversations with students as they are learning than when I'm talking at the front of the room. It also puts me in a position to see how my students are engaging with this material since I'm walking around and see what they are writing down, where they are stopping the videos, and can listen to their conversations. The quality of my interactions (and the student-to-student interactions) is so much higher with this approach.

The main obstacle to my doing this more, however, is the investment of time in creating the videos. With a consultant meeting with us this week and asking us to examine our technology practices, I'm wondering whether others have cracked the code and found ways to be efficient.

Most of my time is spent editing. I do one video at a time for each piece of what I want my students to watch before they try something on their own. I also want my videos to be short (ideally less than 3 minutes each), so I find I'm editing out spoken flubs, unclear descriptions, extra pauses, and time spent writing by hand to reach that ideal. Camtasia is my tool of choice. I know there are videos out there that I could assign rather than recording my own, but I'm convinced I can still work on my efficiency with some good advice.

I wonder if one of the following would work better:

  • Record all of the writing with no narration first. Add voiceover second to match the text.
  • Record all of the direct instruction for an entire class. Edit out flubs, writing, then split into multiple videos for a lesson.
  • Write out all of the written parts before recording. Cut and paste them in the video frame one by one as I speak on top of the video. Gesture and highlight as needed.

I've sacrificed perfection for getting my ratio of recording time to video time down to about four to one. That's still a sizable investment of time, and it certainly benefits my students, but as is, I'm leaving the classroom after 5 PM pretty regularly.

Any experienced flipped classroom folks care to weigh in on this?